Posts for: June, 2015

AmericasDentistsGotTalent-forFixingDamagedorMissingTeeth

A recent episode of “America’s Got Talent” featured an engaging 93-year-old strongman called The Mighty Atom Jr. The mature muscleman’s stunt: moving a full-sized car (laden with his octogenarian “kid brother,” his brother’s wife, plus Atom’s “lady friend”) using just his teeth. Grinning for host Howie Mandel, Atom proudly told the TV audience that his teeth were all his own; then he grasped a leather strap in his mouth, and successfully pulled the car from a standstill.

We’re pleased to see that the Atom has kept his natural teeth in good shape: He must have found time for brushing and flossing in between stunts. Needless to say, his “talent” isn’t one we’d recommend trying at home. But aside from pulling vehicles, teeth can also be chipped or fractured by more mundane (yet still risky) activities — playing sports, nibbling on pencils, or biting too hard on ice. What can you do if that happens to your teeth?

Fortunately, we have a number of ways to repair cracked or chipped teeth. One of the easiest and fastest is cosmetic bonding with tooth-colored resins. Bonding can be used to fill in small chips, cracks and discolorations in the teeth. The bonding material is a high-tech mixture of plastic and glass components that’s extremely lifelike, and can last for several years. Plus, it’s a procedure that can be done right in the office, with minimal preparation or discomfort. However, it may not be suitable for larger chips, and it isn’t the longest-lasting type of restoration.

When more of the tooth structure is missing, a crown (or cap) might be needed to restore the tooth’s appearance and function. This involves creating a replacement for the entire visible part of the tooth in a dental lab — or in some cases, right in the office. It typically involves making a model of the damaged tooth and its neighbors, then fabricating a replica, which will fit perfectly into the bite. Finally, the replacement crown is permanently cemented to the damaged tooth. A crown replacement can last for many years if the tooth’s roots are in good shape. But what if the roots have been dislodged?

In some cases it’s possible to re-implant a tooth that has been knocked out — especially if it has been carefully preserved, and receives immediate professional attention. But if a tooth can’t be saved (due to a deeply fractured root, for example) a dental implant offers today’s best option for tooth replacement. This procedure has a success rate of over 95 percent, and gives you a natural looking replacement tooth that can last for the rest of your life.

So what have we learned? If you take care of your teeth, like strongman Atom, they can last a long time — but if you need to move your car, go get the keys.

If you would like more information about tooth restoration, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”


By Bamberg Dentistry
June 14, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay  
PreventingDentalDiseaseStartswithAssessingYourUniqueRisk

Over the last century dentistry has acquired the knowledge, techniques and treatments to prevent or minimize tooth decay. With this enhanced knowledge we’ve amassed a wealth of data about what increases dental disease development and what prevents it.

This has produced a balanced approach to identifying and treating disease-causing factors and incorporating factors that inhibit tooth decay. Known as Caries Management By Risk Assessment (CAMBRA), this approach first identifies each patient’s individual set of risk factors for dental disease and then develops a customized prevention and treatment plan to minimize their risk.

Rather than simply reacting to occurrences of tooth decay — “drill and fill” — CAMBRA anticipates and targets your susceptibility to decay. The primary factors can be represented by the acronym BAD: Bad bacteria, particular strains that produce acid, which at high levels erode enamel and expose the teeth to infection; Absence of saliva, or “dry mouth,” an insufficient flow of saliva that can’t effectively neutralize acid and restore mineral content to enamel; and Dietary habits too heavy in sugar or acid, which can result in bacterial growth and enamel erosion.

With an accurate picture of your particular risk level we can then apply countering factors from the other side of the balance — those that protect teeth from decay. In this case, we use the acronym SAFE: stimulating Saliva flow when needed or applying Sealants on chewing surfaces most susceptible to decay; Antimicrobials that reduce unhealthy bacteria levels and give healthy bacteria an opportunity to thrive; incorporating Fluoride, a chemical known to strengthen enamel, through hygiene products or direct application to the teeth; and an Effective diet, low in sugar and acid and high in fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

There are a number of preventive and treatment measures that fall into each of the four preventive factors. Using the CAMBRA approach we can develop a treatment and prevention plan that incorporates measures that uniquely fit your dental health situation. With such a plan we can greatly reduce your risk of disease development and impact and better ensure a long and healthy life for your teeth and gums.

If you would like more information on managing dental disease prevention, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Decay: How to Assess Your Risk.”